SE Fighting Back – a Branch of Truth Pharm

SE Fighting Back is a community-based volunteer group dedicated to responding to the heroin and opioid addiction problem in the Sherburne-Earlville School District communities including Sherburne, North Norwich, Smyrna, and Columbus townships in Chenango County and Lebanon and Hamilton townships in Madison County.  Since its formation, SE Fighting Back has become a subsidiary of Truth Pharm, a nonprofit addiction awareness organization in the Southern Tier, to take advantage of Truth Pharm’s resources and knowledge of the issues surrounding the heroin and opioid crisis.

SE Fighting Back Goals
– To raise awareness and educate the public

– To promote prevention, harm reduction and recovery in the S-E communities

2016 Events and Activities Accomplished by SE Fighting Back:

Community Resource/Needs Assessment

Naloxone Trainings

June 16 in Sherburne

October 18 in Smyrna

Forums

April 1 in partnership with SE High School – Assembly for students with impact panel
May 23 in Sherburne – Public awareness event with impact panel

June 21 in Sherburne – In-depth education night including round table discussions

“To Love an Addict” Support Group Initiated – Locations in Norwich and Sherburne on the 2nd and 4th of each month

1st Responder Resource Card – Created for Chenango County and distributed to police, ambulance and fire organizations

Discussions with Mayor Acee of Sherburne and Chenango County Sheriff Cutting to promote formation of a countywide PAARI program.

Provide support to individuals in Chenango County seeking help for themselves or a loved one.

2017 Events and Activities Potentially to Include:
Additional Naloxone Trainings

Community awareness/ education forum(s)

Prescription drug “take-back” day

1st Responder resource card for Madison County
Event in partnership with SE Central School to raise awareness and promote prevention

Initiate Recovery Coach resources for the community by sponsoring individuals to take training

Develop countywide PAARI program in Chenango County
Continued support for individuals seeking rehab and/or integrating back into the community

For More Information find us on Facebook at facebook.com/SEFIGHTINGBACK or email sefightingback@gmail.com. Information about Truth Pharm can be found at truthpharm.org or by emailing truthpharm@gmail.com.

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2016 – A Year of Rainmaking!

So, “what,” you ask “does a Rainmaker do?”

What does Truth Pharm do?

Well, Rainmakers are change-makers, game-changers, powerhouses, people who refuse to accept no for an answer. They are optimistic, driven and produce results. Despite current negative conditions, they work to overcome. When a challenging problem exists with no apparent or clear solution – a Rainmaker will find and create solutions! They will take action.

That’s a Rainmaker – and that is what Truth Pharm is made up of. People who will create change and WILL have an impact on this epidemic.

Per our mission:  Truth Pharm works to raise awareness, reduce the stigma, educate the public and advocate for policy and law changes surrounding substance use and treatment.

And here is a summary of how we went about creating change in 2016!

Awareness and Outreach Events:

  • Hosts for Hancock Awareness Event – 2/11/16 – 70 attendees
  • Guest Speaker for Bainbridge Guilford Afton Awareness event hosted by Lourdes and Senator Akshar 3/9/16 – 350 attendees
  • Tabled at Children’s Wyoming Conference Home Event Binghamton NY – 3/10/16
  • Mind and Magic 3/11/16 – 40 attendees
  • Tabled at The Forks 15 Run Chenango Forks NY – 3/20/16
  • Hosted Walton Awareness Event – 4/13/16 – 140 attendees
  • 1st Annual Jamison Turkow Memorial Walk – 5/7/16 – 300 attendees
  • Hosted Awareness Event Sherburne Earlville – 5/23/16 – 150 attendees
  • Free Hugs Event – 8/5/16 – contact with over 300 people
  • Trail of Truth – International Overdose Awareness Day Walk – 8/31/16 – 350 attendees
  • Illuminating Truth – First Friday Art Walk – street painting, recovery awareness, community resources, recovery celebration, building projection during LUMA – 9/2/16 – 400 attendees
  • Trail of Truth Redo due to county removing our memorial – 9/7/16 – 80 attendees
  • Tabled at Clinton Street Business Fair Binghamton NY – 9/10/16
  • Tabled at Apple Fest Endicott NY – 9/17/16
  • Tabled at Mural Fest Binghamton NY – 9/17/17
  • Presented to Jenny F. Snapp PATS committee regarding parent education Truth Pharm could provide – 10/4/16 – 25 attendees
  • Trunk or Treat – family trick or treating and Awareness event – 10/15/16 – 150 attendees
  • Tabled at 5th Annual Chocolate Festival by Addictions Center of Broome County – 11/6/16
  • Alexis Pleus served on panel of speakers for Roosevelt Institute at Binghamton University to unveil the Binghamton Blueprint – 11/14/16
  • Tabled at the Thankful Jam – 11/22/16
  • Alexis Pleus spoke at New York State SEFA Luncheon about Truth Pharm and the Epidemic – 12/1/16 – 35 attendees
  • Total 2390 attendees reached through awareness events + countless individuals at tabling events

 

Education:

  • Provided 4 hour PAARI Angel Training Oxford, NY – 2/27/16 – 45 attendees
  • Hancock NY – Understanding Signs, Symptoms and Behaviors of Substance Use Disorders – 3/10/16 – 45 attendees
  • Alexis Pleus Keynote speaker at Genesee County Victims Week Conference 4/12/16 – 200 attendees
  • Developing empathy and understanding for people suffering from Substance Use Disorders, Otego, NY – 4/19/16 – 15 attendees
  • Walton NY – Roundtable event – 5/25/16 – 30 attendees
  • Sherburne Earlville NY – Roundtable event – 6/21/16 – 25 attendees
  • Garden of Hope – Monthly education meetings for families – May-Dec. 2016 – 20-50 attendees each event
  • Alexis Pleus speaker for District Attorney’s SAFE Families Program – 8/11/16 – 50 attendees
  • Alexis Pleus speaker for Oxford Community Conversations on Drugs and Use in the Community – 10/20/16 – 50 attendees
  • Hosted John Barry of Southern Tier AIDS Program (STAP) to discuss Safe Injection Sites – 11/17/16 – 35 attendees
  • Total 640 attendees provided in-depth education.

 

Naloxone Training:

  • Hancock NY (STAP) – 2/17/16 – 45 attendees
  • Otego NY (STAP) – 4/19/16 – 15 attendees
  • Walton NY (STAP) – 4/20/16 – 35 attendees
  • Turkow Walk (STAP) – 5/7/16 – 15 referrals to training
  • Binghamton NY (STAP) – 5/26/16 – 25 attendees
  • Walton NY (STAP) – 6/1/16 – 20 attendees
  • Sherburne Earlville NY (STAP) 6/16/16 – 20 attendees
  • 20 families referred directly to STAP for training
  • Total 200 people trained on Naloxone use
  • 9 overdose reversals, 9 lives have been saved using Naloxone kits obtained through sessions hosted by Truth Pharm

School Events:

  • High school assembly in Hancock NY 8th – 12th graders – 5/13/16 – 150 students
  • High school assembly in Oxford NY 9th – 12th graders – 5/18/16 – 150 students
  • High School Assembly in Oxford NY 9th-12th graders – 12/23/16 – 80 students
  • Total 380 school students educated

Community Response Action Plans:

  • Hancock NY – Results: 3 events hosted, a open recreation time for youth created, counselling offered by local pastor – January – March 2016
  • Walton NY – Results: 4 events hosted, a family support group formed, police carrying Naloxone, Police Chief and Mayor developing programs for the county for Substance Use Recovery Supports – March – May 2016
  • Sherburne Earlville NY – Results: 3 events hosted, local company to host corporate education, a family support group created, a lasting branch of Truth Pharm created, Mayor writes letter of support to County for PAARI Program, Police support addition of prescription drop box and sharps disposal in the village – April–June 2016
  • Delhi NY – Results: 2 community events hosted – July–Oct. 2016
  • Total of 4 communities in 3 counties empowered, educated and with long-lasting impacts

National/Federal Involvement:

  • Teleconference with Michael Boticelli – 2/2/16
  • Placed on Facing Addiction Action Committee – (monthly meetings) Feb 2016
  • Attended Hill Day June 2016
  • Alexis Pleus attended “Addiction, a White House Discussion”, White House, DC – 6/7/16
  • Alexis Pleus invited to SAMHSA to provide input on materials to be produced for families who have lost a loved one – 10/27/16

Police & Criminal Justice Outreach:

  • Laid the ground work for Broome County Sheriff’s Office to start a local PAARI Program – 2015
  • Provided program outline for treatment and Vivitrol program at Broome County Jail – 2015
  • Collaborated with Oxford Police to create Oxford Road to Recovery Program, provided volunteer training, host Facebook page, assist with placements, rides and troubleshooting program – Feb.-Dec. 2016 – Placed 28 people in treatment in 2016
  • Assisted District Attorney Cornwell’s SAFE Program Feb.-April 2016
  • Meet with Chenango County to discuss Oxford, NY program – 3/17/16
  • Met with Walton NY Police to discuss carrying naloxone and reducing stigma – 4/5/17
  • Met with Sherburne Earlville Village Police to discuss naloxone and reducing stigma – 7/7/16
  • Met with Binghamton Drug Court, Judge Pellela – 7/22/16
  • Presentation for Penn Yan Heroin Task force on PAARI programs and how to create one in their community – 10/26/16
  • Met with Chenango County Sheriff’s Office to explore options to institute a PAARI Program – 11/15/16

Jail/Incarceration Outreach:

  • Visited two people in Broome County jail to discuss their future and desire to obtain treatment.
  • Assisted three families in advocating for their loved ones while incarcerated at Broome County Jail to be evaluated and then transferred directly to treatment at Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services.
  • Assisted three people and their families to seek and obtain placement in Drug Court to reduce incarceration.
  • Assisted several families to successfully advocate or their loved ones to be place in treatment instead of jail.

Obtaining Treatment, System Navigation, Family Awareness and Education:

  • Assisted more than 50 people in navigating the treatment system and to obtain treatment. Paid for many flights, months of sober living, treatment fees, bus tickets, etc.
  • Assisted more than 200 families through direct contact in understanding their loved ones’ substance use disorder, how to communicate with them and now to navigate the system to obtain help or treatment.

Corporate Education:

  • Provided Employee sensitivity and awareness training for VOA Men’s home – 3/2/16
  • Provided employee sensitivity and awareness training for Sidney Federal Credit Union – 5/17/16
  • Met with Frontier Communications to educate them on the epidemic and what they can do as an employer – 9/21/16

Collaboration Projects:

  • Assisted District Attorney Cornwell’s SAFE Program Feb.-April 2016
  • Seat on Tioga County Community Task Force for Addiction Epidemic (monthly meetings)– 2016
  • Senator Akshar’s Heroin Task Force (quarterly meetings) – 2016
  • Joined JUST – Justice and Unity in the Southern Tier (monthly meetings) – May-Dec. 2016
  • Participated in forum hosted by Assemblyman Al Stirpe to discuss resources to address Substance Use Disorders in NY – 9/22/16

Media:

  • Interview on WIX Radio – 2/3/16
  • Interview with WICZ 2/4/16, 2/22/16, 3/21/16, 8/9/16
  • Participated in WSKG Community Conversation on Opioid Epidemic 2/9/16
  • Kingfisher Project Radio Interview 2/15/16
  • Press & Sun Bulletin Interview 2/16/16, 3/30/16, 7/19/16, 7/28/16
  • WNBF with Roger Neal 3/3/16
  • The Guardian, Chris Arnade – 3/13/16
  • Alexis Pleus has article published in The Fix 2/17/16
  • Kingfisher Project 4/5/16, 5/2/16, 5/9/16, 5/16/16
  • WNBF with Bob Joseph – 8/12/16

Advocacy:

  • Invited to speak at NY Senate Heroin Task Force in Penn Yan – 2/23/16 – 150 attendees
  • Advocated in Albany, met with over 60 Assemblypersons and Senators on a total of 13 visits between February and June 2016
  • Spoke at Governor Cuomo’s Heroin Task Force event at Binghamton University – 5/31/16 – 60 attendees
  • Attended Broome County Legislature meetings to advocate for appropriate spending for opioid epidemic – 10/13/16
  • Met with City of Binghamton to explore ways they can help with the epidemic – 11/9/16

Training:

  • Attended Rotary Luncheon with Jill Halford-Hammit as speaker 2/23/16
  • How communities can work together Webinar – 3/23/16
  • NYCON Board member training Webinar – 3/24/16
  • 8 hour training course – Core Principles Substance Use Treatment – Broome County – 3/30/16
  • NYCON marketing Webinar – 4/21/16
  • All about AA support – ATTC Webinar – 4/21/16
  • Obtained Certification as Naloxone Trainer NY Health Dept. at Tioga County – 4/25/16
  • SAMHSA Chronic Pain Management Webinar – 4/26/16
  • SAMHSA webinar – 4/27/16
  • NYCON Webinar – 4/28/16
  • Attended SAMHSA Hill Day – 6/6-6/7/16
  • Attended Medical Assisted Treatment Training – Broome Co. Drug Court – 8/10/16
  • Mental Health First Aid training – MHAST – 9/20/16
  • Attended Media Summit training for nonprofits by RVSA – 9/23/16
  • Attended NYCON Camp Finance on scholarship – 10/6-10/7/16
  • Attended the Harm Reduction Conference on scholarship 11/2-11/6/16
  • Attended the unveiling of the Surgeon General’s Report on Addiction hosted by Facing Addiction 11/17/16
  • Attended Integrative Harm Reduction Therapy – 24 hour training by Andrew Tatarsky – 12/2-12/4/16

Grants & Fundraising:

  • Applied for $5k for Constitution Pipeline Grant for Naloxone outreach to EMS agencies – awarded $2k for purchase of kits only
  • Applied for $5k for Community Foundation of South Central NY Grant for Tioga County Community Response Action Plans – awarded $2,500
  • A total of $31,910 raised through fundraising events and individual donations
  • Total Year Budget = $36,410.

*2016 was the first year of our 501c3. Since we did not have nonprofit status in 2015, no fundraisers were hosted, no donations were accepted or EVER collected. ALL efforts in 2015 were financially supported and provided by Founder and Director Alexis Pleus.

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How to Offer Support to Grieving Families

As we are waking up to this news of another overdose death, can I please offer some advice?

First, most families will not want to discuss the intricate details of ‘what happened’ though most people seem obsessed or even entitled to know. The families in these early stages are still trying to process and believe ‘what happened’. It’s not your business to ask them. Though if they choose to talk about it, or want to, if you can handle it, let them.

500 messages asking “What happened” is awful and not helpful. Though, 500 messages of how sorry you are, or how wonderful your child is may save your life. Acronyms have never felt more offensive than they did getting them within minutes and hours of getting the news about Jeff. OMG and WTF messages were very upsetting to me. If you message the family member and they don’t respond, whatever you do, do not hound them for a reply. I literally had people doing this to me – demanding to be told what happened or to whom.

If you by some chance learn of the information early on. Remember, it is not for you to share with the world until the family has done so. Most of my family found out because someone posted RIP on my son’s wall before I was even notified of his death. In fact, before his body was even removed from his apartment. His brothers, father and best friends all learned of his passing from a facebook post. It’s NOT your news to share. Wait until the family posts before you post a name or information on social media.

If you don’t know what to say, the best thing to say is, I’m sorry or, I’m here for you. Or, I’ll listen to anything you have to say.

The most comforting thing is to hear about your child. Tell us a story, tell us something they did. Tell us why you’ll miss them. Tell us what you’ll miss about them. Tell us the last happy time you saw them.

Saying, “if there’s anything I can do, call me” is not helpful at all. Immediate family members in severe shock and grief have no idea what to ask people to do and can’t orchestrate volunteers and phone calls. If you want to help them, just find a way. I’ll never forget friends of our family showing up to clean my house and mow my lawn. People brought us food all week and thank god because I never would have been able to make a meal. A friend made flower arrangements to put on the tables at Jeff’s picnic… Another friend stepped in and orchestrated his picnic, many others people worked at his picnic all day and two stayed behind and managed all the clean up. Someone even showed up and brought a huge pack of toilet paper and tissues. I don’t even remember who, but it was incredibly thoughtful and believe me, I wouldn’t have thought to go to a store for anything. These were the gestures that helped us survive the first two weeks. I don’t know what we would have done without this kind of help.

And just going and sitting with them and letting them reminisce is helpful.

The following phrases are not comforting for most people: God has a plan, God must have needed him more, his struggles are over, time heals, it will get better with time, he’s at peace now… at least they were not helpful for me. Whatever you do, don’t compare the loss of a child to a pet… or even a parent… it’s really not the same, only similar.

And absolutely NOTHING about their cause of death, other than ‘you’re sorry’.

And don’t forget the children of, siblings, grandparents and close friends. They need comforting too. It meant a great deal to me to see my youngest son’s friends coming to spend time with him, taking him for a walk, fishing, whatever. He needed that too. And I know I was incapable of comforting my mom, so if I saw someone sitting with her and talking to her, that truly helped me.

I think everyone has good intentions, but it gets tiresome for someone who has just experienced the unimaginable to have to make that excuse for others over and over. Since it probably IS true that everyone has good intentions, it’s good to just try and align those with what is truly helpful.

And keep checking on them… for months… years…

Much love, Alexis Pleus mom of Jeff Dugon forever 28.

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6/1/16 – Our Letter to NY Assembly Ways and Means Committee regarding A9211 – the 90 Day Bill

Greetings,

I understand Bill A9211 is on the Ways and Means schedule for 6/1/16 (probably today as you read this). This bill would require insurance companies to pay for 90 days of inpatient addiction treatment when a physician says it is necessary.

I lost my son to a heroin overdose and there is no doubt in my mind his life would have been spared if it were not for insurance denial after insurance denial for the treatment he desperately needed.

But, it’s not just about my son. As I’m sure you are aware, many lives have been lost and we are losing more lives every single day.

We are a non-profit grassroots organization that works to reduce the stigma associated with addiction, educate about the disease of addiction and this health crisis and advocate for policy change.

We have thousands of members and unfortunately they come with thousands of stories of being denied treatment by their insurance carrier.

Our organization researched all of the bills related to heroin, opioids and addiction at the start of this session to find the bills that would have the greatest impact on the epidemic now – or basically, save the most lives. Of all the bills reviewed, the 90 Day Bill was the clear winner for having the greatest impact on this epidemic and in saving the most lives.

I, along with many of our volunteers, have met with many of you. Today I provided oral testimony at the Governor’s Heroin Task Force Forum in Binghamton, NY. In February I provided testimony in Penn Yan at the Senate’s Heroin Task Force. in April, one of our board members, Penny Stringfield provided testimony at the Senate Heroin Task Force in Binghamton, NY. We have read both reports produced by the Assembly and both reports produced by the Senate along with the 22 bills the Senate passed recently.

And will still say, little legislation has been presented that addresses the health needs of those addicted and who voluntarily ask for help. This 90 Day Bill stands out as being our greatest hope this session.

As far as budgetary concerns, we must consider the real cost of this epidemic and the costs to society and the tax payer now. We must find ways to require the medical industry who created this epidemic to respond responsibly, we must find ways to make the pharmaceutical industry pay for the damage they’ve caused and we must require insurers to cover the treatment for this life threatening illness no different than they do any other illness. These solutions will take the burden off of the New York State tax payer.

Some of the costs we must consider in NOT providing treatment are probation, incarceration, family court, criminal court, parole, rising crime rates, Hepatitis C treatment, foster care, adoption, family services, child protective services, family court, accidents, police enforcement, coroners and funerals. We are paying dearly, we are just not paying on the right end of this epidemic.

Furthermore, the cost of not providing effective treatment from the start, likely costs insurance carriers more. We know people who have gone through outpatient and short term stays 5-10 times and with a proven success rate of only 10%, it is no wonder. Add to that the toll it takes on the family and their health. And Hepatitis C treatments at $100k each.

Providing the type and length of treatment known to be effective from the onset makes sense. It makes sense because their lives are worth saving. It makes sense because it is how we treat all other illnesses. And it makes economic sense.

I’m attaching our Advocacy Agenda we have used for this session. The first page provides a snap shot of what happens when a person asks for help. The second page lists our asks.

We have worked very hard spending many days in Albany letting people know we are hoping for the passage of this bill this session. We request that you consider the positive impact this bill can have on families facing this addiction crisis as well as in protecting the tax payers of New York.

Feel free to contact us for any reason or if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Alexis Pleus
Founder and Director

And all of the Rainmakers at Truth Pharm

Alexis Pleus
Founder
Truth Pharm

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Heroin: Who pays the ultimate cost?

Heroin: Who pays the ultimate cost? By John Christensen

Pleus felt compelled to start an awareness and advocacy organization, Truth Pharm, which has made its way to the national front. They work to raise awareness, reduce stigma, and advocate for programs and policy changes. They have enrolled four police agencies to date in the Gloucester Angel Program, have gotten many people into treatment, and are providing Community Response Action Plans across upstate New York.

“We, like many others, believe the solution to this epidemic is multi-faceted. However, we believe the time for action is now… It isn’t time for a band aid. It’s time for a tourniquet,” she says.

Pleus says what is needed from our lawmakers now is:

1. Humane, medically assisted detox.

2. Same day evaluations.

3. Immediate access to treatment.

4. To require insurers to pay for the type and length of treatment known to be effective.

5. To increase insurance reimbursement rates so that treatment centers can afford to open and operate in New York.

“Everything else is ancillary and can wait. But, we cannot wait for these things,” she adds.

Read entire article here: http://www.chronicle-express.com/article/20160401/NEWS/160339992/?Start=1

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Join us to Advocate for Policy Changes in Albany!

We are visiting Albany to advocate for policy change on May 3rd, May 10th and May 11th.

It is very important that our political leaders hear from us and the struggles we face with finding treatment and having it be affordable and/or approved by our insurance.

Here is our agenda for advocacy for 2016:

Advocacy Agenda for 2016

New York State is not immune to the opioid and heroin epidemic plaguing our country which has progressed now to a crisis. While we have been ahead of the curve on implementation of some important issues such as the Good Samaritan Law and Naloxone access, we remain behind in health parity and treatment access.

As an advocacy organization, we are reminded daily of the many obstacles people seeking help encounter. Here is the typical sequence of events experienced by an individual who has said “I want help”:

  1. They don’t know where to turn and often go to the Emergency Room. Emergency Rooms do not admit for detox, do not transfer patients to detox, rarely line up treatment appointments and often do not give information regarding access to treatment or evaluations.
  2. The individual attempts to schedule an evaluation. The wait time for evaluation appointments in NY varies widely, from 2 days to 5 weeks.
  3. They are most often referred to outpatient treatment, which is known to have a 90% relapse rate.
  4. Co-pays for outpatient treatment are a huge financial burden. One mother recently reported her son was remanded to intensive outpatient treatment 5 days per week. With private insurance, the co-pay is $40 per visit. At $200/week the bill is higher than her mortgage and electric bill combined.
  5. If the person goes to inpatient treatment, there is little information about what the facility offers or provides. Many people report arriving at a facility only to be told ‘you need to detox first’ or the opposite ‘you don’t have enough drugs in your system’. One family said a treatment facility employee suggested the parents take their son to make a purchase so he could shoot up and then he could be admitted.
  6. If they are admitted for detox, few facilities are offering medically assisted humane detox. Even those that are providing it are often saying the person is ‘done detoxing’ after 2-3 days. We had one gentleman told he was ‘done’ less than 48 hours after being admitted.
  7. If the treatment center finds out Medicaid or the insurance will not pay for the stay, the person is immediately asked to leave with no taper from the Suboxone they were started on and no direct link to their next service provider.
  8. For inpatient treatment, insurers in New York are typically only approving 7-14 days of treatment. The average seems to hover around 9 to 10 days. We have not heard of a single family with private insurance or Medicaid that has been provided over 21 days at an inpatient facility.
  9. There are families losing loved ones while they wait for treatment.

Though we believe a multi-faceted approach will ultimately be necessary to conquer this epidemic, nothing is more important than saving those who are desperate for help now. We need our state government to take emergency measures to address those suffering and asking for help now.

Thank you for your time and also offer our help. If you need someone to speak at a hearing, provide testimony or advocate to your colleagues, please call on us. We will help.

We need the following emergency measures:

  1. Same day evaluations for those seeking help.
  2. A treatment protocol for persons taken to the emergency room after an overdose. Attached as “Best Practices for Medical Providers.
  3. Immediate access to treatment or a hospital stay until treatment is available.
  4. Humane, medical detox.
  5. Insurers MUST be required to pay for the type and length of treatment known to be effective. Anyone seeking opioid addiction treatment should be granted 90 days of inpatient treatment at a minimum.
  6. New York State must increase the reimbursement rates so that treatment centers can open and operate here.
  7. A one call system.

These bills would offer a high impact with low cost to New York and are non-controversial:

  1. Require all first responders, fire and police to carry Naloxone.
  2. Require hospitals to provide persons who have overdosed and any support person with them with Naloxone training as well as a kit to take home.
  3. Require all treatment facilities, outpatient clinics and residential facilities:
    1. to have all staff trained in the administration of Naloxone and to have Naloxone on premises;
    2. to follow up after discharge at 14, 30, 60 and 90 days to determine relapse rates and report these statistics to OASAS;
    3. to provide patient and support persons with Naloxone training as well as a kit to take home upon discharge.

The following bills will have a significant impact on the epidemic:

Bill # Description Sponsor
S6478A/ A9211 Requires insurance companies to provide at least ninety days of rehabilitation services to an insured upon a doctor’s prescription Senator Ritchie/ Assemblyman Stirpe
S651 Relates to continuing medical education requirements for doctors, nurses and pharmacists; requires three hours of training on the prevention, treatment and mitigation of opiate analgesics and psychotropic drug addiction. Senator Kennedy
S647 Requires the department to draft guidelines for the transition of patients from substances with a high risk of addiction to those with a low risk. Senator Kennedy
S660 Requires disclosure of addiction risks for certain prescription drugs; requires physicians, nurses and pharmacists to provide information on prevention, mitigation and treatment of prescription drug addiction and to have the patient sign a form acknowledging education of such risks. Senator Kennedy
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Heroin epidemic: Encouraging treatment

Alexis Pleus lost her son to a heroin overdose last year.

She says along with helping addicts find treatment, society must eliminate the negative stigma attached to addiction to help encourage users to seek help.

“When Jeff passed away, I learned within 24 hours that I didn’t want to tell anyone how he had died because of the way people treated me,” said Pleus. “I started Truth Pharm. We want to work on reducing the stigma, which is really important to me because the less we judge people who have addictions, the more likely they are to reach out for help.”

Truth Pharm hopes to assist the sheriff’s office to get the Angels program rolling — but there are some road blocks.

“As soon as the bed spaces come up, I think we’ll be in good order then,” said Harder.

When Action News asked if the Angels Program could happen in the county without more inpatient centers opening locally, Harder said he wasn’t sure.

“Good question,” he said. “I don’t know yet.”

Harder has ideas of where to build a new treatment facility.

“They want to close down the Broome Developmental Center, why not make that a treatment center?” said Harder. “You’ve got the state hospital, why not go into a treatment center for there? The big thing is cost. That’s what’s holding the whole thing up it seems.”

Pleus said the county could look at the heroin epidemic as an opportunity to lead.

“Rather than being upset that we have an epidemic or upset that we have this addiction crisis, we could be the county that’s looked on positively by putting money into the issue, trying to get people that are addicted treatment, trying to turn this epidemic around, and showing care and love,” said Pleus. “It doesn’t have to be negative, it could be positive.”

See the full report By Julianne Peixoto here.

 

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