Heroin epidemic: Encouraging treatment

Alexis Pleus lost her son to a heroin overdose last year.

She says along with helping addicts find treatment, society must eliminate the negative stigma attached to addiction to help encourage users to seek help.

“When Jeff passed away, I learned within 24 hours that I didn’t want to tell anyone how he had died because of the way people treated me,” said Pleus. “I started Truth Pharm. We want to work on reducing the stigma, which is really important to me because the less we judge people who have addictions, the more likely they are to reach out for help.”

Truth Pharm hopes to assist the sheriff’s office to get the Angels program rolling — but there are some road blocks.

“As soon as the bed spaces come up, I think we’ll be in good order then,” said Harder.

When Action News asked if the Angels Program could happen in the county without more inpatient centers opening locally, Harder said he wasn’t sure.

“Good question,” he said. “I don’t know yet.”

Harder has ideas of where to build a new treatment facility.

“They want to close down the Broome Developmental Center, why not make that a treatment center?” said Harder. “You’ve got the state hospital, why not go into a treatment center for there? The big thing is cost. That’s what’s holding the whole thing up it seems.”

Pleus said the county could look at the heroin epidemic as an opportunity to lead.

“Rather than being upset that we have an epidemic or upset that we have this addiction crisis, we could be the county that’s looked on positively by putting money into the issue, trying to get people that are addicted treatment, trying to turn this epidemic around, and showing care and love,” said Pleus. “It doesn’t have to be negative, it could be positive.”

See the full report By Julianne Peixoto here.

 

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